C++ – the difference between ‘typedef’ and ‘using’ in C++11

c++c++11typedefusing-declaration

I know that in C++11 we can now use using to write type alias, like typedefs:

typedef int MyInt;

Is, from what I understand, equivalent to:

using MyInt = int;

And that new syntax emerged from the effort to have a way to express "template typedef":

template< class T > using MyType = AnotherType< T, MyAllocatorType >;

But, with the first two non-template examples, are there any other subtle differences in the standard? For example, typedefs do aliasing in a "weak" way. That is it does not create a new type but only a new name (conversions are implicit between those names).

Is it the same with using or does it generate a new type? Are there any differences?

Best Solution

They are equivalent, from the standard (emphasis mine) (7.1.3.2):

A typedef-name can also be introduced by an alias-declaration. The identifier following the using keyword becomes a typedef-name and the optional attribute-specifier-seq following the identifier appertains to that typedef-name. It has the same semantics as if it were introduced by the typedef specifier. In particular, it does not define a new type and it shall not appear in the type-id.