Javascript – What’s the difference between “Array()” and “[]” while declaring a JavaScript array

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What's the real difference between declaring an array like this:

var myArray = new Array();

and

var myArray = [];

Best Solution

There is a difference, but there is no difference in that example.

Using the more verbose method: new Array() does have one extra option in the parameters: if you pass a number to the constructor, you will get an array of that length:

x = new Array(5);
alert(x.length); // 5

To illustrate the different ways to create an array:

var a = [],            // these are the same
    b = new Array(),   // a and b are arrays with length 0

    c = ['foo', 'bar'],           // these are the same
    d = new Array('foo', 'bar'),  // c and d are arrays with 2 strings

    // these are different:
    e = [3]             // e.length == 1, e[0] == 3
    f = new Array(3),   // f.length == 3, f[0] == undefined

;

Another difference is that when using new Array() you're able to set the size of the array, which affects the stack size. This can be useful if you're getting stack overflows (Performance of Array.push vs Array.unshift) which is what happens when the size of the array exceeds the size of the stack, and it has to be re-created. So there can actually, depending on the use case, be a performance increase when using new Array() because you can prevent the overflow from happening.

As pointed out in this answer, new Array(5) will not actually add five undefined items to the array. It simply adds space for five items. Be aware that using Array this way makes it difficult to rely on array.length for calculations.